Photo 21 Jul 119 notes blazemcscience:

My mom is in Paris right now and she just sent me this

blazemcscience:

My mom is in Paris right now and she just sent me this

Photo 20 Jul 497 notes 1337tattoos:

Aleksey Burkov

1337tattoos:

Aleksey Burkov

Video 20 Jul 77,718 notes

owning-my-truth:

Source: Truths You Won’t Believe

Debunking more lies and racist misinformation about black men. Stop the ignorance and start to question why these myths exist in the first place, if not to demonize black men and promote the image of us as inherently criminal and violent and incapable of being educated. 

Photo 20 Jul 9,422 notes
via carameul.
Photo 20 Jul 572,733 notes mcbridewashere:

devisamarama:

hussiejuststahp:

vbhsfdjavgd:

Why is this so cool?

..Are those little staples? WHY WOULD YOU STAPLE BREAD TO THE WALL.



If I hit my post limit for this….

mcbridewashere:

devisamarama:

hussiejuststahp:

vbhsfdjavgd:

Why is this so cool?

..Are those little staples? WHY WOULD YOU STAPLE BREAD TO THE WALL.

If I hit my post limit for this….

(Source: thingsorganizedneatly)

Chat 17 Jul 1,943 notes
  • Meat eater: what about the people who pick YOUR vegetables?
  • Vegan: Wait, what do you mean MY vegetables? don't you eat vegetables as well? What are you doing for these peoples rights other than using their struggles as a convenient "gotcha card" in attempts to silence vegans from talking about non human oppression? anything? And I'm guessing since you care so much about migrant workers in poor conditions, you are doing everything in your power to fight for those working in slaughterhouses and meat packing facilities since they are known to be one of the most dangerous and unsafe work places in the entire world, yes?
  • Meat eater: Well...
  • Vegan: Don't you think you should spend a little less time trying to belittle the efforts of people who are genuinely trying to cause the least amount of damage to animals, the environment and humans, and spend more time trying to make an effort of your own?
  • Meat eater: um, I mean...
  • Meat eater: bacon lol
  •  THIS
via .
Text 14 Jul 94 notes

dion-thesocialist:

On a scale of 1 to Anakin Skywalker turning to the dark side of the force, how poorly do you react to bad dreams?

Text 13 Jul 2,053 notes We need to talk about Anne Frank

beloved-falling:

historicity-was-already-taken:

As of this writing, John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars has sold over one million copies, and holds a place on several bestseller lists. The film adaptation of the book has made over two hundred million dollars in the domestic and foreign market. The book and the movie tell the story of two terminally ill American teenagers, and both contain a scene where the protagonists, Hazel and Augustus, share a kiss in the Anne Frank House. John Green made the following statement regarding the scene:

“Anne Frank was a pretty good example of a young person who ended up having the kind of heroic arc that Augustus wants—she was remembered and she left this mark that he thinks is valuable—but when he has to confront her death, he has to confront the reality that really she was robbed of the opportunity to live or die for something. She just died of illness like most people. And so I wanted him to go with a sort of expectation of her heroism and be sort of dashed.”

Here, Green makes it clear that he reads Anne Frank’s death as being from an illness like “most people,” like his protagonist. In doing so, he erases the circumstances under which she contracted typhus. “Most people” are not Ashkenazic Jewish teenage girls who contracted typhus in a concentration camp during the Holocaust. This fundamental erasure of the context of her death allowed him, those involved in the cinematic adaptation, and yes, a large portion of his readership, to accept the use of Anne Frank and her death as a prop in this American YA love story. Indeed, when further called on the issue, Green stated:

“I’ve been getting this question a lot. I can’t speak for the movie, obviously, as I didn’t make it, but as for the book: The Fault in Our Stars was the first non-documentary feature film to be granted access to the Anne Frank House precisely because the House’s board of directors and curators liked that scene in the novel a great deal. (A spokesperson recently said, ‘In the book it is a moving and sensitively handled scene.’) Abraham H. Foxman, national director of the Anti-Defamation League and a Holocaust survivor, had this to say: ‘The kissing scene in ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ in the annex of the Anne Frank House is not offensive or against who Anne Frank was. What Anne communicated in her diary was hope. She celebrated life and she celebrated hope.’ Obviously, the Anne Frank House and the ADL do not have a monopoly on Anne’s life or her legacy, but their opinions are important to me.”

I take issue with this response. Here, Green is divesting himself of responsibility for the scene, and communicating to his critics that he is not to blame, because the Anne Frank House board of directors, curators, and a Holocaust survivor approved of it. In other words, he is drawing these peoples’ assumed authority to silence criticism, and to avoid taking responsibility for the filmed version of a scene he created.

The Anne Frank House, for all the wonderful work it does, is a museum. Like all museums, it must work to attract and reach out to potential patrons. In other words, museums have to advertise because they require patrons and revenues to exist. Therefore, I read the official approval of the Anne Frank House simply as a targeted attempt to reach out to and attract a pool of untapped, younger patrons. They chose to support the filming of a sympathetic romantic scene about terminally ill teenagers in their institution to reach out to young people. While that is a sound business decision, I would argue that it’s hardly an ethical one for the Anne Frank House, an institution devoted, as per their website, to:

“the preservation of the place where Anne Frank went into hiding during the Second World War, and to bringing the life story of Anne Frank to the attention of as many people as possible worldwide with the aim of raising awareness of the dangers of anti-Semitism, racism and discrimination and the importance of freedom, equal rights and democracy,”

to support the filming of this scene. For, in Green’s own words, that scene had nothing to do with the context of Anne Frank’s death, and therefore, it did nothing to bring Anne Frank’s story to life. And it hardly raises awareness of contemporary European anti-Semitism.

As for the ADL, I very much agree with Mr. Foxman’s assessment of Anne Frank. However, what she celebrated in her life and her writings have little to do with what she has come to mean in within public memory of the Holocaust of European Jewry. Her narrative has been used by nations and educational systems to the extent that for many, she is the Holocaust; she is the face of the Holocaust. But what we inherit from her isn’t the experience of the Holocaust. That experience, and her death at Bergen Belsen take place outside the pages of her diary. Readers are never forced to experience the Holocaust through her eyes; they are able to embrace the tragedy of the Holocaust through her story while remaining removed from its experiential realities. Thus, Anne Frank becomes the Holocaust without forcing anyone to experience it. Her name can be invoked to summon tragedy, without forcing anyone to feel it.

While Anne Frank may be the face of the Holocaust of European Jewry, the memory of the experiential reality of the Holocaust is male. The way we conceptualize and remember the concentration camp experience is constructed by male narratives. More Jewish men survived the Holocaust than Jewish women. Due to attitudes towards education in the interwar period, more male Jewish survivors had the education and literary capital needed to craft enduring narratives of their experiences than did female Jewish survivors. There are three foundational male Holocaust survival narratives: Night by Elie Wiesel, Survival in Auschwitz by Primo Levi, and Maus by Art Spiegelman about his father’s Holocaust experience. Never have I seen those three men and their narratives used as a joke, or a meme, or a cheap narrative device, or as self-promotion by an American pop star.

These men are revered, and their narratives taken extremely seriously. And none of them, none of them have been used in a prop in a story about terminally ill gentile American teenagers. They survived, in perhaps the type of heroic arc a John Green protagonist would yearn for. Yet Augustus doesn’t look to them. He doesn’t share a kiss with his girlfriend at Auschwitz. He shared a kiss with her in the Anne Frank House.

Anne Frank is not a prop. She is not a symbol, she is not a teenager who happened to die of an illness, and she is not one of the canonical Jewish male survivors. She is one of many millions of Jewish women and girls who were industrially murdered like livestock, incinerated, and left in an unmarked grave. That is the story of the Holocaust of European Jewry, and that is the story of the persecution and murder of all Europeans (the disabled, Romani, Irish Travelers, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Communists) who failed to fit into Nazi racial and ideological constructs.

And we would all do well to remember that.

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A good point. I haven’t read TFIOS so I can’t speak as to how the scene feels, but a very interesting point in the analysis nonetheless. 

Photo 13 Jul 1,002,000 notes
Video 12 Jul 46,324 notes

maybeiwantthetrouble:

Woman? Is that meant to insult me?”

(Source: lady-lannistarth)


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